Archive for May, 2011

The Official Facebook Marketing Guide

By May 12, 2011

Reminiscent of the Twitter Guide for Business, Facebook has now released the Best Practice Guide: Marketing on Facebook. It’s the official resource on how to make the best use of Facebook’s advertising products, analytics, social plugins and a host of resources to grow your business. The introduction states that Facebook “allows businesses to create rich social experiences, […]

Reminiscent of the Twitter Guide for Business, Facebook has now released the Best Practice Guide: Marketing on Facebook. It’s the official resource on how to make the best use of Facebook’s advertising products, analytics, social plugins and a host of resources to grow your business.

The introduction states that Facebook “allows businesses to create rich social experiences, build lasting relationships and amplify the most powerful type of marketing – word of mouth.” The guide further defines that they call the Facebook Ecosystem of Build, Engage and Amplify.

The heart of the guide is divided into two parts. The first is the Five Guiding Principles of best practices for Facebook marketing, but they also apply to any Social Business Marketing efforts:

Five Guiding Principles

  1. Build a strategy that is social by design
  2. Create an authentic brand voice
  3. Make it interactive
  4. Nurture your relationships
  5. Keep learning

The second part of the guide provides key business objectives and for each one describes a five-step process for achieving those objectives.

Facebook By Business Objective

  1. Foster product development and innovation
  2. Generate awareness
  3. Drive preference and differentiation
  4. Increase traffic and sales
  5. Build loyalty and deepen relationships
  6. Amplify recommendation and word of mouth
  7. Gain insights

The real-world value come from the examples they give of how prominent brands (Levis, Clorox, M&M’s, Adidas, OnStar, Alamo, and more) have used the Facebook Ecosystem to accomplish their goals. For learning about social business, it doesn’t get any better than that. Well, it does actually, but only if I work with you to do the same for your brand (just let me know if you’d like to talk about it).

Oh, one last thing: Here’s the link to download the PDF file of: Best Practice Guide: Marketing on Facebook .

Categories : Case Studies | Facebook | marketing | SocialMedia (0) Comment

Presentation Tip #140: Make it Tweet-Worthy

By May 3, 2011

I was listening to Mack Collier (@MackCollier on Twitter) presenting to a social media group in Birmingham on the subject of How to Handle Negative Comments (follow the link to the slideshare presentation). I was following the hashtag (#alsocme) on twitter (using the HootSuite client) and I thought of an important tip when giving a presentation […]

I was listening to Mack Collier (@MackCollier on Twitter) presenting to a social media group in Birmingham on the subject of How to Handle Negative Comments (follow the link to the slideshare presentation). I was following the hashtag (#alsocme) on twitter (using the HootSuite client) and I thought of an important tip when giving a presentation to media savvy audiences. I noticed that when someone in the audience would turn a good phrase into a tweet, that message would get retweeted by many in the room. Those not so eloquent did not get many retweets.

As a presenter you want to get tweeted and re-tweeted. The best way to facilitate that is to spoon feed the audience with a Tweet-worthy message. Something akin to the 10 second sound bites that politicians use to drive home their point.  So, for each presentation select about three key points you want to get across and craft them in Tweet-friendly style and length (about 120 characters to allow for the tweeter’s username).  One popular example from today’s presentation was:

RT @griner: When companies respond to negative comments, 33% of customers follow up w/ positive review. -@MackCollier #ALSocMe

In this instance, an interesting factoid caught the attention of the audience, but it doesn’t have to be fact-based. Opinions and quotes can be Tweet-worthy as well.  Next time you’re viewing a presentation’s hashtag search results conduct some research of your own and then see what you can add to your next presentation. I’ll retweet if for you!

Categories : SocialMedia (3) Comment