Archive for June, 2007

Onscreen Retailing

By June 5, 2007

While home shopping networks such as QVC and HSN pioneered the concept of t-commerce (television commerce), their limited product offerings have left much to be desired for most. A new retail concept, ICE , is hoping to change the t-commerce category by bringing brands and consumers together through onscreen product placement in a one-stop shopping […]

While home shopping networks such as QVC and HSN pioneered the concept of t-commerce (television commerce), their limited product offerings have left much to be desired for most.

A new retail concept, ICE , is hoping to change the t-commerce category by bringing brands and consumers together through onscreen product placement in a one-stop shopping experience.
While websites such as SeenON! have touched on the idea of purchasing show-based product, ICE is different in that it essentially turns any footage, ranging from live TV shows to DVR’d movies and even DVDs and VHS (old or new), into an onscreen retailer.

Almost everything you see will be available for purchase, e.g., Carrie Bradshaw’s nameplate necklace, Jack Bauer’s cellphone, or songs heard on Weeds. With IVC (interactive video commerce), viewers can “click” through highly organized menus, selecting product ranging from categories such as jewelry, electronics, clothing, and appliances to more media-based product such as in-show music, video, and show branded merchandise.

There’s even a sponsor section, where viewers can check out the brands and products advertised during the show. Viewers also have an option to access detailed information on the show and cast members. The search and purchasing process is similar to an online retailer, but instead of using a mouse, viewers use their remote control to click through selections, choose color/size/version, etc., and ultimately buy items.

While still in the production stages, ICE is one of the first technologies to fully expand on t-commerce. With consumers skipping traditional ads through DVR, DVDs, and on-demand programming, this service could offer a welcome alternative to brands, marketers, and consumers.

Article from Trendcentral.com

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Who Blogs? Odds Are Marketers Have No Idea

By June 5, 2007

Every year millions of people create blogs, and even more check in daily to read them.There are about 15 million active blogs read by 57 million people, a number that gives bloggers great credibility, power and influence as sources of information for everything from news to corporate reputations to product purchasing. “This is simply not […]

Every year millions of people create blogs, and even more check in daily to read them.
There are about 15 million active blogs read by 57 million people, a number that gives bloggers great credibility, power and influence as sources of information for everything from news to corporate reputations to product purchasing. “This is simply not a passing fad that can be ignored,” said Michael Gartenberg, analyst with Jupiter Research.

For instance: A few weeks ago, the well-respected tech blog Engadget published reports that Apple’s iPhone and Leopard operating system would be seriously delayed. Apple’s stock price took an immediate dive, dropping some $4 billion in market capitalization before it was discovered that the information came from a fake leaked memo. Apple was not amused, although its stock did level out by the end of that same day.

One of the big reasons blogs have such impact is their credibility among readers. In a February poll from We Media and Zogby Interactive, 72% of adults said they were dissatisfied with the quality of American journalism today. Another 55% said bloggers are important to the future of American journalism, and 74% said citizen journalism will play a vital role, according to the poll. Consumers are also taking bloggers’ word before they buy.

A late 2006 Ipsos MORI survey found that blogs were a more trusted source of information than advertising or e-mail marketing. One-third of respondents said they had decided not to buy a product after reading a negative blog post, while 52% were persuaded to buy after reading a positive review.

Article from Adage.com

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